Footings

DEFINITION of 'Footings'

A final balance when adding the debits and credits on an accounting balance sheet. Equity capital is also taken into consideration when calculating the final balance. Footings are commonly used in bookkeeping to determine final balances to be put on the financial statements.

BREAKING DOWN 'Footings'

A footing is the sum of a column of figures. For example:

Debits Credits
100 200
250 50
75 40
(135)

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