Foreign Bank Supervision Enhancement Act - FBSEA

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Foreign Bank Supervision Enhancement Act - FBSEA'

An act enacted on December 19, 1991 to increase the Federal Reserve's authority over foreign banks seeking entry into the United States. Part of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act (FDICIA) of 1991. The act enabled the Fed to not only supervise authorization of foreign banks applying for operating ability in the U.S., but also existing foreign banks already operating within the country.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Foreign Bank Supervision Enhancement Act - FBSEA'

Foreign banks were able to operate within the United States free of federal regulation until the International Banking Act of 1978 was passed. When enacted, the act limited foreign banks' geographic expansion and banking activities to similar U.S.-based banks and required foreign banks to carry adequate reserves. By the time the Federal Bank Supervision Enhancement Act was passed, more than 280 foreign banks were operating in the U.S., and held more than $626 billion in assets, or 18% of all banking assets in the U.S.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Correspondent Bank

    A financial institution that provides services on behalf of another, ...
  2. International Banking Act of 1978

    Federal banking legislation that put all domestic bank branches ...
  3. National Bank

    In the United States, a commercial bank chartered by the comptroller ...
  4. Bank

    A financial institution licensed as a receiver of deposits. There ...
  5. Federal Reserve System - FRS

    The central bank of the United States. The Fed, as it is commonly ...
  6. Bank Insurance

    A guarantee by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is free enterprise affected by monetary policy?

    Monetary policy is concerned with the quality, quantity and function of money instruments in an economy. Perhaps the best ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the business consequences of using FIFO vs. LIFO accounting methods?

    If a company uses a first-in, first-out accounting method (FIFO), it's likely that its reported earnings will be higher than ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do you analyze inventory on the balance sheet?

    In accounting, inventory represents a company's raw materials, work in progress and finished products. Financial professionals ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What were the objectives of the Glass-Steagall Act?

    The objectives of the Glass-Steagall Act were “to provide for the safer and more effective use of the assets of banks, to ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. In what types of economies are regressive taxes common?

    Regressive taxation systems are more likely to be found in developing countries or emerging market economies than in the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Will The US Economy Rebound In The 2nd Quarter?

    Most investors know that U.S. 1st quarter growth numbers aren’t pretty. Economic statistics have been missing expectations by the largest margin since 2009
  2. Economics

    The U.S. Economy May Be Stronger Than You Think

    While the economic performance in the U.S. broadly disappointed in the first quarter, temporary factors presented one-off events that depressed output.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  4. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  5. Investing

    REITs 101: How They're Regulated

    Here's everything you need to know about REITs in less than five minutes.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Why Last In First Out Is Banned Under IFRS

    We explain why Last-In-First-Out is banned under IFRS
  7. Economics

    Understanding Carrying Value

    Carrying value is the value of an asset as listed on a company’s balance sheet. Carrying value is the same as book value.
  8. Economics

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)

    International Financial Reporting Standards are accounting rules and guidelines governing the reporting of different types of accounting transactions.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Property, Plant and Equipment

    Property, plant and equipment are company assets that are vital to business operations, but not easily liquidated.
  10. Economics

    How to Calculate Trailing 12 Months Income

    Trailing 12 months refers to the most recently completed one-year period of a company’s financial performance.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fisher Effect

    An economic theory proposed by economist Irving Fisher that describes the relationship between inflation and both real and ...
  2. Fiduciary

    1. A person legally appointed and authorized to hold assets in trust for another person. The fiduciary manages the assets ...
  3. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  4. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  5. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  6. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
Trading Center