Foreign Housing Exclusion And Deduction

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DEFINITION of 'Foreign Housing Exclusion And Deduction'

An allowance for taxpayers who live and work in a foreign country to exclude any amount that their employer allocates to them to cover housing costs. The exclusion applies regardless of whether the expenses are paid directly to the taxpayer or on his or her behalf. This exclusion applies for expenses related to housing, rent, repairs, utilities and several other types of expenses.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Foreign Housing Exclusion And Deduction'

In order to qualify for this exclusion, taxpayers must meet the same time criteria as for the bona fide resident or physical-presence tests. Qualifying expenses may also include payments intended to equalize taxes and education expenses for the taxpayer's children or dependents. Costs relating to the purchase of property or the employ of domestic servants do not qualify for the exclusion.

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