Foreign Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Foreign Bond'

A bond that is issued in a domestic market by a foreign entity, in the domestic market's currency. A foreign bond is most often issued by a foreign firm to raise capital in a domestic market that would be most interested in purchasing the firm's debt. For foreign firms doing a large amount of business in the domestic market, issuing foreign bonds is a common practice.
Types of foreign bonds include bulldog bonds, matilda bonds and samurai bonds.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Foreign Bond'

Foreign bonds are regulated by the domestic market authorities and are usually given nicknames that refer to the domestic market in which they are being offered.
Since investors in foreign bonds are usually the residents of the domestic country, investors find them attractive because they can add foreign content to their portfolios, without the added exchange rate exposure.

RELATED TERMS
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