Foreign Currency Effects

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DEFINITION of 'Foreign Currency Effects'

The gain or loss on foreign investments due to changes in the relative value of assets denominated in a currency other than the principal currency with which a company normally conducts business. A rising domestic currency means foreign investments will result in lower returns when converted back to the domestic currency. The opposite is true for a declining domestic currency.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Foreign Currency Effects'

Foreign investments are complicated by currency fluctuation and conversion between countries. A high-quality investment in another country may prove worthless because of a weak domestic currency. Foreign-denominated debt used to purchase domestic assets has led to bankruptcy in several cases due to a fast decline in a domestic currency or a rapid rise in the currency of the foreign-denominated debt.

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