Forensic Audit

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Forensic Audit'

An examination and evaluation of a firm's or individual's financial information for use as evidence in court. A forensic audit can be conducted in order to prosecute a party for fraud, embezzlement or other financial claims. In addition, an audit may be conducted to determine negligence or even to determine how much spousal or child support an individual will have to pay.




INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Forensic Audit'

Forensic auditing is a specialization within the field of accounting, and forensic auditors often provide expert testimony during trial proceedings. Most large accounting firms have a forensic auditing department.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Voodoo Accounting

    Creative rather than conservative accounting practices. Voodoo ...
  2. Cookie Jar Accounting

    A disingenuous accounting practice in which periods of good financial ...
  3. Short-Form Report

    A brief summary of an audit that has been performed. The short-form ...
  4. Audit Cycle

    The accounting process that auditors employ in the review of ...
  5. Certified Forensic Financial Analyst ...

    A specialized accounting credential offered by the Financial ...
  6. Financial Forensics

    A field that combines criminal investigation skills with financial ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How can I find net margin by looking a company's financial statements?

    In finance and accounting, financial statements represent the fundamental means of analyzing a company's financial position, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What can working capital turnover ratios tell a trader?

    A company's working capital turnover ratio is traditionally positively correlated with business performance. A high, or better ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some high-profile examples of wash trading schemes?

    In 2012, the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) was accused of a complex wash trading scheme to profit from a Canadian tax provision, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is a negative write-off?

    A negative write-off is a write-off conducted by a company or accountant after deciding not to pay back an individual or ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What metrics can be used when evaluating a telecommunications company to ensure its ...

    Cash flow analysis has been transformed since the widespread introduction of statements of cash flow, and investors have ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do you record adjustments for accrued revenue?

    An accountant records adjustments for accrued revenues through debit and credit journal entries in defined accounting periods ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    Top 8 Ways Companies Cook The Books

    Find out more about the fraudulent accounting methods some companies use to fool investors.
  2. Options & Futures

    Handcuffs And Smoking Guns: The Criminal Elements Of Wall Street

    From godfathers to perps, familiarize yourself with the "criminal elements" creeping around Wall Street.
  3. Personal Finance

    A Look At Accounting Careers

    More than just crunching numbers, this career blends detective work with trouble shooting.
  4. Markets

    Financial Statement Manipulation An Ever-Present Problem For Investors

    The SEC has taken steps to eliminate this type of corporate fraud, but it remains a real risk for investors.
  5. Retirement

    Common Clues Of Financial Statement Manipulation

    Search for the "bloody" fingerprints in accounting crimes.
  6. Professionals

    Financial History: The Rise Of Modern Accounting

    Find out how these two have grown hand-in-hand throughout our modern history.
  7. Options & Futures

    Uncovering A Career In Forensic Accounting

    Does a job as a financial sleuth sound interesting to you? Dig in to learn more.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Common Size Income Statement

    A common size income statement expresses each account as a percentage of net sales.
  9. Professionals

    What Does an Auditor Do?

    An auditor ensures that organizations maintain accurate and honest financial records.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating the Net Debt to EBITDA Ratio

    Financial analysts typically use the net debt to EBITDA ratio to determine a company’s ability to pay its debt.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  2. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  3. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
  4. Sin Tax

    A state-sponsored tax that is added to products or services that are seen as vices, such as alcohol, tobacco and gambling. ...
  5. Grandfathered Activities

    Nonbank activities, some of which would normally not be permissible for bank holding companies and foreign banks in the United ...
  6. Touchline

    The highest price that a buyer of a particular security is willing to pay and the lowest price at which a seller is willing ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!