Forensic Accounting

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DEFINITION of 'Forensic Accounting'

Forensic Accounting utilizes accounting, auditing, and investigative skills to conduct an examination into a company's financial statements. Thus, providing an accounting analysis that is suitable for court.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Forensic Accounting'

Forensic accountants are trained to look beyond the numbers and deal with the business reality of a situation. They are frequently used in fraud cases.

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  5. How does additional paid in capital affect retained earnings?

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