Form 1065

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DEFINITION of 'Form 1065'

A tax document used to report the profits, losses and deductions of a business' partners. Form 1065 is part of the Schedule K-1 document, and is prepared for each individual partner. The document identifies the percentage share of profit and loss assigned to each partner, both at the beginning of the reporting period and at the end.




INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Form 1065'

All profits and losses from a partnership are passed directly to the partners; the partnership never pays any taxes itself. Organizations that are exempt from paying income taxes, such as religious organizations, have to fill out Form 1065 as well.

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