Form 1099-B

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DEFINITION of 'Form 1099-B'

A form issued by a broker or barter exchange that summarizes the proceeds of all stock transactions. The sale of a stock will be accompanied by a gain or loss, which must be reported to the IRS when you file your taxes. Specifically, figures from form 1099-B are used on IRS Form 1040, Schedule D.

Brokers are required to provide you form 1099-B by January 31.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Form 1099-B'

For example, let's assume you sold several stocks within the last year and the proceeds of the transactions equal a capital gain of $10,000. The amount gained from the sale of the stocks will be issued in form 1099-B by your broker and this amount must be included when you file your income taxes.

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