SEC Form 13F

What is the 'SEC Form 13F'

The SEC form 13F is a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), also known as the Information Required of Institutional Investment Managers Form. It is a quarterly filing required of institutional investment managers with over $100 million in qualifying assets. Companies required to file SEC Form 13-F may include insurance companies, banks, pension funds, investment advisers and broker-dealers. This form, which must be filed within 45 days of the end of each quarter, contains information about the investment manager and potentially a list of their recent investment holdings.

BREAKING DOWN 'SEC Form 13F'

SEC Form 13-F was made famous by investment con artist Bernie Madoff. It provides investors with an inside look at the holdings of Wall Street's largest investment managers. While this form can provide valuable insight into the management style of some of Wall Street's best, history has proven that these forms are only truly usable by investors when the investment manager reports accurately and honestly.

Related Forms: SEC Forms 13-FE, 13-G.

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