Form 1098

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DEFINITION of 'Form 1098'

A form filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that details the amount of interest and mortgage-related expenses paid on a mortgage during the tax year. These expenses can be used as deductions on a U.S. income tax form, Schedule A, which reduces taxable income and the overall amount owed to the IRS. The mortgage lender is required by the IRS to provide this form to borrowers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Form 1098'

There are several additional 1098 Forms:

1. 1098-C details the donations of vehicles, boats and airplanes
2. 1098-E is for the interest paid on qualified student loans
3. 1098-T details tuition and related fees during the year.

Each of these forms is filed with the IRS and specific information or amounts on each of the forms are added into your tax return, which are used as deductions to reduce taxable income.

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  5. What does the IRS say about what constitutes taxable income?

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