Form T

DEFINITION of 'Form T'

A form that FINRA requires brokers to use for reporting equity trades executed outside of normal market hours. Form T trades occur during extended hours - before the market opens and after it closes. The objective of the Form T reports is to maintain market transparency and integrity.

BREAKING DOWN 'Form T'

Trading in extended hours enables investors to react quickly to events that typically occur outside regular market hours, such as earnings reports. However, liquidity may be constrained during such Form T trading, resulting in wide bid-ask spreads. Form T trading is especially suited for overseas investors, since they may conduct the bulk of their U.S. trading when their markets are open but U.S. markets are closed.

The growing popularity of electronic communication networks means that Form T trading is bound to continue increasing.

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