Formula Method

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DEFINITION of 'Formula Method '

A technique for calculating termination payments on a prematurely ended swap. Termination payments are used to compensate the party who did not cause the swap to end early for its financial loss. Because they are not very liquid, currency swaps tend to use the formula method, but it is one of the less common methods for calculating damages.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Formula Method '

Of the three official methods for calculating termination payments as established by the International Swaps and Derivatives Association, the agreement value method, which is based on the terms available for a replacement swap, is most common. The third method, the indemnification method, is not often used. A swap may be terminated early if a termination event such as an illegality, tax event, tax event upon merger or credit event occurs. An event of default, such as bankruptcy or failure to pay, can also cause early termination.



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