Fortune 100

DEFINITION of 'Fortune 100'

An annual list of the 100 largest public and privately-held companies in the United States. The ranking is compiled using gross revenue figures, and is published by Fortune magazine.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fortune 100'

The Fortune 100 list is more exclusive than both the Fortune 500 and Fortune 1000 lists, both of which rank more companies. Because it only covers U.S. companies, the list does not take foreign companies into consideration, though many of the listed companies do have international operations.

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