Forward Spread

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DEFINITION of 'Forward Spread'

The price difference between the spot price of a security and the forward price of the same security taken at a specified interval. The forward spread is usually calculated using the forward price one month after the spot price. An at par forward spread is found when the spot price and the forward price are the same.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Forward Spread'

For example: The spot price of the security is 1.02. The forward price, taken one month later, is 1.07. Therefore, the forward spread is 0.05, or 5 basis points.

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