Forward Integration

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DEFINITION

A business strategy that involves a form of vertical integration whereby activities are expanded to include control of the direct distribution of its products.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

A good example of forward integration is when a farmer sells his/her crops at the local market rather than to a distribution center.


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