Forward Integration

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DEFINITION of 'Forward Integration'

A business strategy that involves a form of vertical integration whereby activities are expanded to include control of the direct distribution of its products.

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BREAKING DOWN 'Forward Integration'

A good example of forward integration is when a farmer sells his/her crops at the local market rather than to a distribution center.

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RELATED FAQS
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