Fourth World

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DEFINITION of 'Fourth World'

These are the most underdeveloped regions in the world. The Fourth World is used to describe the most poverty stricken, and economically troubled parts of countries in the Third World. Unlike the First, Second and Third World, the Fourth World does not have any political ties and is often based on a hunter-gatherer lifestyle. This area includes tribal and nomadic communities. They may be fully functional and self surviving units, but based on their economical performance as a whole they are placed under the Fourth World status.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fourth World'

Fourth World nations can consist of those excluded from society. For example, the Aborginal tribes in South America or Australia. These tribes are entirely self sufficient, but they do not participate in the global economy. From a global standpoint, these tribes are considered to be Fourth World nations, but they are able to function free from any assistance from others. Fourth World nations do not contribute or consume anything on the global scale, and are unaffected by any global events.

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