Franchise Factor

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DEFINITION of 'Franchise Factor'

The measurement of the impact on a company's price-earnings (P/E) ratio per unit growth in new investment. For example, a franchise factor of 3 would indicate that the P/E ratio of a company would increase by three units for every unit of growth in the company's book value.

The franchise factor can be calculated as the product of annual investment returns in excess of market returns and the duration of the returns. A P/E ratio will not be elevated with a high franchise factor alone.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Franchise Factor'

A company with a high franchise factor will have exceptionally high P/E ratios in comparison to its book value. This comes from the ability to continually capitalize on basic strengths, rather than the financial strength of the business. Because this is the case in many franchises, the term "franchise factor" was developed.

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