Franchise Factor

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Franchise Factor'

The measurement of the impact on a company's price-earnings (P/E) ratio per unit growth in new investment. For example, a franchise factor of 3 would indicate that the P/E ratio of a company would increase by three units for every unit of growth in the company's book value.

The franchise factor can be calculated as the product of annual investment returns in excess of market returns and the duration of the returns. A P/E ratio will not be elevated with a high franchise factor alone.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Franchise Factor'

A company with a high franchise factor will have exceptionally high P/E ratios in comparison to its book value. This comes from the ability to continually capitalize on basic strengths, rather than the financial strength of the business. Because this is the case in many franchises, the term "franchise factor" was developed.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Multiple

    A term that measures some aspect of a company's financial well-being, ...
  2. Trailing Price-To-Earnings - Trailing ...

    The sum of a company's price-to-earnings, calculated by taking ...
  3. Price-Earnings Ratio - P/E Ratio

    A valuation ratio of a company's current share price compared ...
  4. Forward Price To Earnings - Forward ...

    A measure of the price-to-earnings ratio (P/E) using forecasted ...
  5. Price to Tangible Book Value - ...

    A valuation ratio expressing the price of a security compared ...
  6. Price-To-Book Ratio - P/B Ratio

    A ratio used to compare a stock's market value to its book value. ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Why are P/E ratios generally higher during times of low inflation?

    Inflation affects equity prices in several ways. Most importantly, investors are willing to pay less for a certain level ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Where can I find the P/E ratios for the Dow and S&P 500?

    When it comes to valuing stocks, the price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio is one of the oldest and most frequently used metrics. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does the market share of a few companies affect the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index ...

    In economics and commercial law, the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) is a widely used measure that indicates the amount ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does the rule of 70 indicate about a country's future economic growth?

    The rule of 70 could be used to indicate the approximate number of years that it would take a company's economic growth to ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is the rule of 70 related to the growth rate of a variable?

    The rule of 70 is related to the growth rate of a variable because it uses the growth rate in its approximation of the number ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the benefits of using ceteris paribus assumptions in economics?

    Most, though not all, economists rely on ceteris paribus conditions to build and test economic models. The reason they do ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Taking Stock Of Discounted Cash Flow

    Learn how and why investors are using cash flow-based analysis to make judgments about company performance.
  2. Trading Strategies

    10 Tips For The Successful Long-Term Investor

    These guiding principles will help you avoid common folly during the decision-making process.
  3. Budgeting

    The P/E Ratio: A Good Market-Timing Indicator

    Check out the returns this newer technical analysis tool would've yielded over the period from 1920 to 2003.
  4. Markets

    Understanding The P/E Ratio

    Learn what the price/earnings ratio really means and how you should use it to value companies.
  5. Markets

    Reading Financial Tables Tutorial

    Learn about six common types of financial tables and figure out how to interpret them.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  7. Economics

    What is Deadweight Loss?

    Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any deficiency caused by an inefficient allocation of resources.
  8. Economics

    How to Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis

    The benefits of a given situation or business-related action are summed and then the costs associated with taking that action are subtracted.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI)

    The Herfindhal-Hirschman Index, (HHI) is a measure of market concentration and competition among market participants.
  10. Investing

    How To Implement A Smart Beta Investing Strategy

    Smart beta investing is the notion of re-writing investment rules to improve investment outcomes by targeting exposures to intuitive ideas or factors.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  2. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  3. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  4. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  5. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  6. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
Trading Center