Franchise

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DEFINITION of 'Franchise'

A type of license that a party (franchisee) acquires to allow them to have access to a business's (the franchisor) proprietary knowledge, processes and trademarks in order to allow the party to sell a product or provide a service under the business's name. In exchange for gaining the franchise, the franchisee usually pays the franchisor initial start-up and annual licensing fees.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Franchise'

Franchises are a very popular method for people to start a business, especially for those who wish to operate in a highly competitive industry like the fast-food industry. One of the biggest advantages of purchasing a franchise is that you have access to an established company's brand name; meaning that you do not need to spend further resources to get your name and product out to customers.

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