Franked Investment Income

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DEFINITION of 'Franked Investment Income'

Income that is received as a tax-free distribution by one company in the U.K. from another. This income is typically tax-free to the receiving firm and is usually distributed in the form of a dividend. Franked investment income was introduced in the interest of avoiding double taxation of corporate income.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Franked Investment Income'

If ABC company pays franked investment income to XYZ company, XYZ company does not have to pay tax on the income. This is because the tax was assessed on ABC company before the income was paid. In essence, the tax paid on this income is also attributed to the receiving firm.

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