Free Asset Ratio - FAR

DEFINITION of 'Free Asset Ratio - FAR'

A metric used to determine whether an insurance company has sufficient free capital to fully cover its financial obligations. The free asset ratio (FAR) is calculated by subtracting the required minimum margin of solvency from available assets and dividing this figure by admissible assets. The higher the FAR, the better the capacity of the insurer to cover its policy liabilities and other obligations.

BREAKING DOWN 'Free Asset Ratio - FAR'

Free asset ratios furnished by different insurance companies may not always be comparable, as they may use differing assumptions and interpretations in calculating free assets and valuing liabilities. Nevertheless, a high FAR would generally indicate a strong financial position and surplus capital, while a low FAR would imply a weak balance sheet and possibly a need for imminent injection of capital.




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