Free Cash Flow To Equity - FCFE

What is 'Free Cash Flow To Equity - FCFE'

Free cash flow to equity (FCFE) is a measure of how much cash can be paid to the equity shareholders of a company after all expenses, reinvestment and debt are paid. FCFE is a measure of equity capital usage. It is calculated as FCFE = Net Income - Net Capital Expenditure - Change in Net Working Capital + New Debt - Debt Repayment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Free Cash Flow To Equity - FCFE'

FCFE is often used by analysts in an attempt to determine the value of a company. This method of valuation gained popularity as an alternative to the dividend discount model, especially if a company does not pay a dividend. Although free cash flow to equity may calculate the amount available to shareholders, it does not necessarily equate to the amount paid out to shareholders.

Calculation and Calculation Inputs

Specifically, free cash flow to equity is composed of net income, capital expenditures, working capital and debt. Net income is located on the company income statement. Capital expenditures can be found within the cash flows from investing section on the cash flow statement. Working capital is also found on the cash flow statement; however, it is in the cash flows from operations section. In general, working capital represents the difference between the company’s most current assets and liabilities. These are short-term capital requirements related to immediate operations. Net borrowings can also be found on the cash flow statement in the cash flows from financing section. It is important to remember that interest expense is already included in net income so you do not need to add back interest expense.

How to Interpret

Analysts also use FCFE to determine if dividend payments and stock repurchases are paid for with free cash flow to equity or some other form of financing. Investors want to see a dividend payment and share repurchase that is fully paid by FCFE. If FCFE is more than the dividend payment and the cost to buy back shares, the company is funding with either debt or existing capital. Existing capital includes retained earnings made in previous periods. This is not what investors want to see in a current or prospective investment, even if interest rates are low. Some analysts argue that borrowing to pay for share repurchases when shares are trading at a discount and rates are historically low is a good investment. However, this is only the case if the company's share price goes up in the future.

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