Frequency Of Exclusion

DEFINITION of 'Frequency Of Exclusion '

Frequency of exclusion refers to the rate of occurrences where a group is excluded from a sample or study. The frequency of exclusion would attempt to define the percentage or rate that a specified group is under-represented in a sample or study. Statistical study results lose their meaningfulness if the sample group does not accurately represent the entire population of interest.

BREAKING DOWN 'Frequency Of Exclusion '

For example, one could determine the rate at which persons with a certain blood type are excluded from a particular medical study. If a certain blood group is not properly represented in the research study, then the effects of a tested drug will not reflect the actual results that will occur when the drug hits the market.

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