Frequency Distribution

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DEFINITION of 'Frequency Distribution'

A representation, either in a graphical or tabular format, which displays the number of observations within a given interval. The intervals must be mutually exclusive and exhaustive. Frequency distributions are usually used within a statistical context.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Frequency Distribution'

The size of the intervals used in a frequency distribution will depend on the data being analyzed and the goals of the analyst. However, the most important factor is that the intervals used must be non-overlapping and contain all of the possible observations.

For example, a frequency distribution in a tabular format for weekly stock returns may look like:

Frequency Distribution
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