Financial Risk Manager - FRM

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DEFINITION of 'Financial Risk Manager - FRM'

A financial designation, obtained through the Global Association of Risk Professionals (GARP) by achieving a passing score on the Financial Risk Manager (FRM) examination, having an active membership in GARP and by having two years of experience in financial risk management.

The FRM program and exam, follows the major strategic disciplines of risk management: market risk, credit risk, operational risk and investment management.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Financial Risk Manager - FRM'

Recognized in over 90 countries across the globe, the FRM designation, is designed to measure a financial risk manager's ability to manage risk in a global environment. The FRM exam is challenging, having a pass rate of only 44.35% in 2007.

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