Frozen Account

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DEFINITION of 'Frozen Account'

An account to which no withdrawals or purchases can be charged. This usually occurs when the account holder fails to pay promptly for purchases charged to the account. For example, cash accounts are frozen for 90 days until the full purchase price of the intended order is paid in full.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Frozen Account'

In other words, when your bank account is frozen, it's because you owe money to someone. Any creditor that has a judgment against you can have your bank account frozen. The creditor can actually freeze your account for up to twice the amount you owe. If you receive a notice from your bank stating that your account has been frozen, look for the lawyer and phone number that is listed on the notice. If you didn't receive a notice after your account was frozen, call your bank and ask for the lawyer's name and phone number so you can settle the account.

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