Frugalista

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DEFINITION of 'Frugalista'

People who keep up with fashion trends without spending a lot of money. Frugalistas stay fashionable by shopping through alternative outlets, such as online auctions, secondhand stores and classified ads. They also reduce the amount of money spent in other areas of their lives, such as by growing their own food and reducing entertainment expenses. This is a popular term during recessions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Frugalista'

Frugalistas also try to maintain expensive-looking cosmetic appearances. For example, they may still get an expensive haircut, but they might cut back on their TV subscription to afford the recurring expense.

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