FTSE RAFI US 1000 Index

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DEFINITION of 'FTSE RAFI US 1000 Index'

An index of stocks based on the largest 1,000 fundamentally ranked companies. The FTSE RAFI US 1000 Index was launched on November 28, 2005 as part of FTSE Group's non-market cap weighted stocks. The fundamental weighting factors include dividends, book value, sales and cash flow.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'FTSE RAFI US 1000 Index'

The FTSE RAFI US Index tries to reduce the exposure to overvalued stocks. This is especially true for stocks that have recently seen a seemingly unsustainable increase in price. For example the index will have less exposure to stocks that have seen large increases in price compared to their earnings (called P/E ratio). This lower exposure is compared to a market-cap weighted index.

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