Fulcrum Point

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DEFINITION of 'Fulcrum Point'

The turning point in which a security or the economy in general makes a major change in direction. A fulcrum point can be very profitable for investors who are able to identify that a sharp price move is about to take place. For example, after the U.S. equity markets plunged in late 2008, they recovered sharply in early 2009.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fulcrum Point'

It is very difficult to predict or identify a fulcrum point contemporaneously, but the promise of very high returns keeps many investors looking for them. Unfortunately, these movements are so rare that few succeed in both predicting that a movement should occur and in timing the movement correctly. Often, what may seem initially to be a major sharp reversal may instead turn out to be just a minor movement before the major trend resumes.

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