Full Delivery Shares

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DEFINITION of 'Full Delivery Shares'

A rating given to the stock of a company traded on the Taiwan Stock Exchange, when the stock's book value per share falls below the exchange's required minimum of five New Taiwan dollars. Full delivery shares represent ownership in a financially struggling company and have limited liquidity. Investors must fully pay for these shares in advance of completing a trade. Full delivery shares cannot be traded on margin and are not included in the Taiwan Stock Exchange Corporation weighted index.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Full Delivery Shares'

Though it is possible to make money by trading these shares, they are considered a risky investment, because the companies they represent may have no income or assets and may essentially be bankrupt. In the United States, such low-valued stocks would be traded in the over-the-counter or unlisted markets.

Full delivery shares are more commonly called full delivery stock or full delivery securities.

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