Full Recourse Debt

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DEFINITION of 'Full Recourse Debt'

A guarantee that no matter what happens, the borrower will repay the debt. Typically with a full recourse loan no occurrence, such as loss of job or sickness, can get the borrower out of the debt obligation. In this situation, if there is no collateral for the loan, the lender can go after the borrowers personal assets to collect if the loan is defaulted.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Full Recourse Debt'

In contrast, a limited recourse loan would only allow the lender to take assets that are listed as collateral in the signed loan agreement. Also, a non-recourse loan would have no collateral and the lender would only be able to take the asset that is being financed, such as a home in a non-recourse mortgage.

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