Full Value

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DEFINITION of 'Full Value'

The total worth of a financial instrument or organization. Full value encompasses both intrinsic and extrinsic features. It includes the underlying value of an asset as well as the other intended and unintended benefits the asset brings.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Full Value'

Perhaps the best way to demonstrate full value is to juxtapose it with simple value. For example, while the newest incarnation of Yankee Stadium was built for $1.5 billion, its full value is largely determined by the New York Yankees, the team for which the facility was named. Without the Yankees calling the stadium home, the value, full or otherwise, of Yankee Stadium would probably be considerably less than the construction costs.

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