Full Value

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Full Value'

The total worth of a financial instrument or organization. Full value encompasses both intrinsic and extrinsic features. It includes the underlying value of an asset as well as the other intended and unintended benefits the asset brings.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Full Value'

Perhaps the best way to demonstrate full value is to juxtapose it with simple value. For example, while the newest incarnation of Yankee Stadium was built for $1.5 billion, its full value is largely determined by the New York Yankees, the team for which the facility was named. Without the Yankees calling the stadium home, the value, full or otherwise, of Yankee Stadium would probably be considerably less than the construction costs.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Market Value

    The price an asset would fetch in the marketplace. Market value ...
  2. Relative Value

    A method of determining an asset's value that takes into account ...
  3. Subjective Theory Of Value

    The idea that an object's value is not inherent, and is instead ...
  4. Perceived Value

    The worth that a product or service has in the mind of the consumer. ...
  5. Extrinsic Value

    The difference between an option's market price and its intrinsic ...
  6. Intrinsic Value

    1. The actual value of a company or an asset based on an underlying ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    What Is The Labor Market Conundrum?

    We are facing a conundrum with investment implications: Why are wages still stagnant, when jobs are being created at the fastest pace since the late 90's?
  2. Economics

    Understanding Impairment

    In finance and accounting, impairment refers to the loss of value of a company’s capital stock.
  3. Economics

    What is a Promissory Note?

    A written promise by one party to pay another party a definite sum of money either on demand or at a specified future date.
  4. Savings

    How Microeconomics Affects Everyday Life

    Microeconomics is the study of how individuals and businesses make decisions to maximize satisfaction. Microeconomic principles can describe many everyday experiences. We use renting a New York ...
  5. Charts & Patterns

    Why These Could Be 2015's 10 Best Biotech Stocks

    A quick look at a 10 biotech companies that are poised to deliver for shareholders in 2015.
  6. Personal Finance

    Why Are Tesla Cars So Expensive?

    What makes Tesla cars so expensive? Short supply and pricey parts is a good place to start.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How To Build A Bond Ladder?

    Bond laddering is a strategy used when building a portfolio: an investor can spread out interest rate risk and create a stream of cash flows for income.
  8. Economics

    What is M1?

    M1 is a measurement of money supply that includes all hard currency, plus demand deposits such as checking accounts.
  9. Charts & Patterns

    Why These Could Be 2015's 10-Best Media Stocks

    A list of top-tier and speculative media stocks for 2015.
  10. Investing

    Why Is The Nasdaq 5,000 Different This Time?

    The Nasdaq this week has slipped below the 5,000 high-water mark it reached last week. The last time it hit above 5,000 was in March 2000.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Income Effect

    In the context of economic theory, the income effect is the change in an individual's or economy's income and how that change ...
  2. Price-To-Sales Ratio - PSR

    A valuation ratio that compares a company’s stock price to its revenues. The price-to-sales ratio is an indicator of the ...
  3. Hurdle Rate

    The minimum rate of return on a project or investment required by a manager or investor. In order to compensate for risk, ...
  4. Market Value

    The price an asset would fetch in the marketplace. Market value is also commonly used to refer to the market capitalization ...
  5. Preference Shares

    Company stock with dividends that are paid to shareholders before common stock dividends are paid out. In the event of a ...
  6. Accrued Interest

    1. A term used to describe an accrual accounting method when interest that is either payable or receivable has been recognized, ...
Trading Center