Full Employment

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Full Employment'

A situation in which all available labor resources are being used in the most economically efficient way. Full employment embodies the highest amount of skilled and unskilled labor that could be employed within an economy at any given time. The remaining unemployment is frictional.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Full Employment'

Frictional unemployment is the amount of unemployment that results from workers who are in between jobs, but are still in the labor force. Full employment is attainable within any economy, but may result in an inflationary period. The inflation would result from workers, as a whole, having more disposable income, which would drive prices upward.

Many economists have estimated the amount of frictional unemployment, with the number ranging from 2-7% of the labor force.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Structural Unemployment

    A longer-lasting form of unemployment caused by fundamental shifts ...
  2. Job Footprint

    The scope and range of an employee's duties while under a company's ...
  3. Disguised Unemployment

    Unemployment that does not affect aggregate output. Disguised ...
  4. Geographical Labor Mobility

    This refers to the level of freedom that workers have to relocate ...
  5. Frictional Unemployment

    Unemployment that is always present in the economy, resulting ...
  6. Cyclical Unemployment

    A factor of overall unemployment that relates to the cyclical ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    What Is Fiscal Policy?

    Learn how governments adjust taxes and spending to moderate the economy.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Curbing The Effects Of Inflation

    Your investments suffer when general price levels rise. Learn how you can control the damage with IPSs.
  3. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  4. Economics

    The Importance Of Inflation And GDP

    Learn the underlying theories behind these concepts and what they can mean for your portfolio.
  5. Economics

    Does A Junk Rating Reflect Russia's Fundamentals?

    Moody’s, like other credit rating agencies, has downgraded Russia’s sovereign debt rating to non-investment grade, but does this reflect Russia's economy?
  6. Investing

    What Has Been Groupon’s Growth Strategy?

    Groupon established a strategy with efforts to become a broader force in the e-commerce world and to expand more strongly into international markets.
  7. Economics

    The Impact Of Ending The US Embargo On Cuba

    Many argue that ending the US embargo on Cuba will not only make US consumers happy, but also help the US economy and bring more freedoms to Cuba.
  8. Economics

    Is The US Dependence On Foreign Oil Necessarily A Bad Thing?

    We examine the myths and facts about US dependence upon foreign oil.
  9. Budgeting

    How Your Government's Budgetary Decisions Impact the Public Sector

    Issues facing the public sector are not unlike some issues facing America’s oldest and largest companies, but with larger and broader impacts.
  10. Economics

    Afraid Of A New Financial Crisis?

    It may be time for the U.S. to adopt a model for financial companies that better deters risky financial behavior.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fixed Cost

    A cost that does not change with an increase or decrease in the amount of goods or services produced. Fixed costs are expenses ...
  2. Subsidy

    A benefit given by the government to groups or individuals usually in the form of a cash payment or tax reduction. The subsidy ...
  3. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  4. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  5. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  6. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
Trading Center