Full Stock

DEFINITION of 'Full Stock'

A stock with a par value of $100 per share. A full stock issue can be either a preferred share or common share. A full stock share would imply that a stock does not trade openly in public market, and thus its value is derived from its value relative to par, which in most cases would be $100. A stock's par value however is completely arbitrary and can be set at any level.

BREAKING DOWN 'Full Stock'

Stocks are generally issued with a zero par value - as they are traded in the market. The par value is not zero only when the stock is purchased directly from the company, in which case the par value is determined by the company through accounting measures. In countries where a par level is required to trade in a public market, most publicly traded shares will be given a par value of one cent, or a value very close to zero.

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