Full Stock


DEFINITION of 'Full Stock'

A stock with a par value of $100 per share. A full stock issue can be either a preferred share or common share. A full stock share would imply that a stock does not trade openly in public market, and thus its value is derived from its value relative to par, which in most cases would be $100. A stock's par value however is completely arbitrary and can be set at any level.


Stocks are generally issued with a zero par value - as they are traded in the market. The par value is not zero only when the stock is purchased directly from the company, in which case the par value is determined by the company through accounting measures. In countries where a par level is required to trade in a public market, most publicly traded shares will be given a par value of one cent, or a value very close to zero.

  1. Par

    Short for "par value," par can refer to bonds, preferred stock, ...
  2. Par Value

    The face value of a bond. Par value for a share refers to the ...
  3. No-Par Value Stock

    Stock that is issued without the specification of a par value ...
  4. Stock

    A type of security that signifies ownership in a corporation ...
  5. Half Stock

    Stock sold with a par value half of what is considered standard. ...
  6. Horizontal Line

    A line that appears to proceed from left to right, or parallel ...
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