Full-Time Student

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DEFINITION of 'Full-Time Student'

A status that is important for determining dependency exemptions. Full-time status is based on what the individual's school considers full time.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Full-Time Student'

An individual enrolled in a post-secondary institution may be eligible for certain tax breaks.

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