Fully Convertible Debenture - FCD

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DEFINITION of 'Fully Convertible Debenture - FCD'

A type of debt security where the whole value of the debenture is convertible into equity shares at the issuer's notice. The ratio of conversion is decided by the issuer when the debenture is issued. Upon conversion, the investors enjoy the same status as ordinary shareholders of the company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fully Convertible Debenture - FCD'

The main difference between FCDs and other convertible debentures is that the company can force conversion into equity, whereas in other types of convertible securities, the owner of the debenture may have that option.

FCDs also differ from partially convertible debentures (PCDs). In case of PCDs, part of the instrument is redeemed and part of it is converted into equity,

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