Fully Depreciated Asset


DEFINITION of 'Fully Depreciated Asset'

A property, plant, or piece of equipment which, for accounting purposes, is worth only its salvage value. Whenever an asset is capitalized, its cost is depreciated over several years according to a depreciation schedule. Theoretically, this provides a more accurate estimate of the true expenses of maintaining the company's operations each year.

BREAKING DOWN 'Fully Depreciated Asset'

In reality, it is difficult to predict the useful life of an asset, so depreciation expenses represents only a rough estimate of the true amount of an asset used up each year. Conservative accounting practices dictate that, when in doubt, it is more prudent to use a faster depreciation schedule so that expenses are recognized earlier. In that way, if the asset does not live out the expected life, the company does not incur an unexpected accounting loss. Due to these factors, it is not unusual for a fully depreciated asset to still be in good working order and producing value for the firm.

  1. Business Asset

    A piece of property or equipment purchased exclusively or primarily ...
  2. Accelerated Depreciation

    Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax ...
  3. Intangible Asset

    An asset that is not physical in nature. Corporate intellectual ...
  4. Depreciation

    1. A method of allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its ...
  5. General Depreciation System - GDS

    The most commonly used modified accelerated cost recovery system ...
  6. Tangible Asset

    Assets that have a physical form. Tangible assets include both ...
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  1. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What can working capital be used for?

    Working capital is used to cover all of a company's short-term expenses, including inventory, payments on short-term debt ... Read Full Answer >>

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