Fully Paid Shares

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DEFINITION of 'Fully Paid Shares'

Shares issued in which no more money is required to be paid to the company by shareholders on the value of the shares. When a company issues shares upon incorporation or through an issuance, either initial or secondary, shareholders are required to pay a set amount for those shares. Once the company has received the full amount from shareholders, the shares become fully paid shares.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fully Paid Shares'

This is in contrast to partially paid shares in which only a portion of the face value has been received by the company. In the case of partially paid shares, the shareholder is still required to pay the remaining amount to the company. For example, let's say Company XYZ sells shares for $50. If the company has received $50, it becomes a fully paid share, but if less than $50 has been collected, it is a partially funded share.

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