Functional Cost Analysis (FCA)

DEFINITION of 'Functional Cost Analysis (FCA)'

A voluntary survey provided by the Federal Reserve Board outlining the cost of banking at different institutions. The functional cost analysis is posted on a yearly basis to illustrate the changes in fees over the years. The survey includes, among others, such costs as monthly account fees, deposits, withdrawls and transit items.

BREAKING DOWN 'Functional Cost Analysis (FCA)'

While this survey does provide some useful information, it must be taken as somewhat incomplete. As the survey is voluntary, only a small percentage of all institutions are listed. As well, it does not include all relevant information as items in the midst of collection and other balance sheet entries are not part of the survey.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Check

    A written, dated and signed instrument that contains an unconditional ...
  2. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  3. High-Low Method

    In cost accounting, a way of attempting to separate out fixed ...
  4. Commercial Bank

    A financial institution that provides services, such as accepting ...
  5. Federal Reserve Board - FRB

    The governing body of the Federal Reserve System. The seven members ...
  6. Central Bank

    The entity responsible for overseeing the monetary system for ...
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    What Was The Glass-Steagall Act?

    Established in 1933 and repealed in 1999, the Glass-Steagall Act had good intentions but mixed results.
  2. Insurance

    Your First Checking Account

    This owner's manual will show you what to expect from your bank.
  3. Options & Futures

    Choose To Beat The Bank

    From internet banking to credit unions, it's in your power to cut fees and maximize service.
  4. Options & Futures

    Who Backs Up The FDIC?

    The FDIC insures depositors against loss, but what happens if it runs out of money?
  5. Options & Futures

    How To Break Up With Your Bank

    Whether you're moving or have just found a better no-fee plan, find out how to switch banks with ease.
  6. Investing News

    What's the Fed Going to do in 2016?

    Learn about the factors that contribute to increases in the federal funds rate by the Federal Reserve and key economic indicators for 2016.
  7. Economics

    How Interest Rates Affect The U.S. Markets

    When indicators rise more than 3% a year, the Fed raises the federal funds rate to keep inflation under control.
  8. Economics

    Forces Behind Interest Rates

    Interest is a cost for one party, and income for another. Regardless of the perspective, interest rates are always changing.
  9. Markets

    The (Expected) Market Impact of the 2016 Election

    With primary season upon us, investor attention is beginning to turn to the upcoming U.S. presidential election.
  10. Bonds & Fixed Income

    3 Risks U.S. Bonds Face in 2016

    Learn about the major risks for the bond market in 2016; interest rate increases, high-yield bond volatility and a flatter yield curve may be issues.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How does online banking assist with budgeting?

    Setting up online banking can make a personal budget easier to manage through the use of multiple accounts or expense categories ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the Wall Street Journal prime rate forecast work?

    The prime rate forecast is also known as the consensus prime rate, or the average prime rate defined by the Wall Street Journal ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is a basis point (BPS)?

    A basis point is a unit of measure used in finance to describe the percentage change in the value or rate of a financial ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What happens if interest rates increase too quickly?

    When interest rates increase too quickly, it can cause a chain reaction that affects the domestic economy as well as the ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. When was the last time the Federal Reserve hiked interest rates?

    The last time the U.S. Federal Reserve increased the federal funds rate was in June 2006, when the rate was increased from ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Do lower interest rates increase investment spending?

    Lower Interest rates encourage additional investment spending, which gives the economy a boost in times of slow economic ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  2. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  3. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
  4. Quarterly Earnings Report

    A quarterly filing made by public companies to report their performance. Included in earnings reports are items such as net ...
  5. Dark Pool Liquidity

    The trading volume created by institutional orders that are unavailable to the public. The bulk of dark pool liquidity is ...
Trading Center