Functional Cost Analysis (FCA)


DEFINITION of 'Functional Cost Analysis (FCA)'

A voluntary survey provided by the Federal Reserve Board outlining the cost of banking at different institutions. The functional cost analysis is posted on a yearly basis to illustrate the changes in fees over the years. The survey includes, among others, such costs as monthly account fees, deposits, withdrawls and transit items.

BREAKING DOWN 'Functional Cost Analysis (FCA)'

While this survey does provide some useful information, it must be taken as somewhat incomplete. As the survey is voluntary, only a small percentage of all institutions are listed. As well, it does not include all relevant information as items in the midst of collection and other balance sheet entries are not part of the survey.

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