Future Capital Maintenance


DEFINITION of 'Future Capital Maintenance'

A term used to account for future expenses that a company expects to incur in order to maintain its fixed assets. This includes the funds necessary to renew, repair or replace an asset in order for it to continue to function as needed.

BREAKING DOWN 'Future Capital Maintenance'

In order to obtain accurate earnings projections, the value of capital including future maintenance costs must first be determined. State, county and local governments can issue municipal bonds to raise funds for future capital maintenance costs.
  1. Capital Maintenance

    An accounting concept based on the principle that income is only ...
  2. Real Property

    Any property that is attached directly to land, as well as the ...
  3. Tangible Asset

    Assets that have a physical form. Tangible assets include both ...
  4. Hard Asset

    A tangible and physical item or object of worth that is owned ...
  5. Earnings

    The amount of profit that a company produces during a specific ...
  6. Capital Improvement

    The addition of a permanent structural improvement or the restoration ...
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    Using The Price-To-Book Ratio To Evaluate Companies

    The P/B ratio can be an easy way to determine a company's value, but it isn't magic!
  2. Retirement

    The Essentials Of Corporate Cash Flow

    Tune out the accounting noise and see whether a company is generating the stuff it needs to sustain itself.
  3. Budgeting

    Use ROA To Gauge A Company's Profits

    Do you rely too heavily on ROE? Consider using return on assets for a more complete picture.
  4. Markets

    Intangible Assets Provide Real Value To Stocks

    Intangible assets don't appear on balance sheets, but they're crucial to judging a company's value.
  5. Economics

    Explaining Like-for-Like Sales

    Companies use like-for-like sales figures to compare sales volume from one period to another.
  6. Term

    What's a Sector?

    The term sector has several applications in economics and finance.
  7. Investing

    How Worried Should We Be About China?

    An economic slowdown, a freezing up in trade and plunging markets and currencies are casting a shadow across Asia—and the globe. How worried should we be?
  8. Economics

    What are Acquisition Costs?

    A company can recognize acquisition costs as those costs used to buy property and equipment.
  9. Investing News

    Hearst and Condé Nast in the Digital Age

    Condé Nast and Hearst are converting potential loss into opportunity by adapting to the digital age and transforming their products and operations.
  10. Investing

    How To Create a Winning Elevator Pitch

    Whether you are talking to potential investors, partners, customers or employees, the skill of being able to concisely summarize your business is critical.
  1. Do dividends affect working capital?

    Regardless of whether cash dividends are paid or accrued, a company's working capital is reduced. When cash dividends are ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do prepayments provide working capital?

    Prepayments, or prepaid expenses, are typically included in the current assets on a company's balance sheet, as they represent ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include inventory?

    A company's working capital includes inventory, and increases in inventory make working capital increase. Working capital ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  2. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  3. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  4. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  5. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  6. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!