Futures Bundle

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DEFINITION of 'Futures Bundle'

A type of futures order that enables an investor to purchase a predefined number of futures contracts in each consecutive quarterly delivery month for a period of two or more years.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Futures Bundle'

A futures bundle is an order containing all the quarterly futures contracts within the standard two-, three-, four- or five-year bundle periods. For example, a large gold-mining company would benefit from using a futures bundle to stabilize the price it will receive for its gold over the next four years.

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