Fuzzy Logic

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DEFINITION of 'Fuzzy Logic'

A mathematical logic that attempts to solve problems by assigning values to an imprecise spectrum of data in order to arrive at the most accurate conclusion possible. Fuzzy logic is designed to solve problems in the same way that humans do: by considering all available information and making the best possible decision given the input.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Fuzzy Logic'

Fuzzy logic is often applied by advanced trading models/systems that are designed to react to changing markets. The goal of this type of system is to analyze thousands of securities in real time and to present the trader with the best available opportunity.

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