Commodity Pairs

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DEFINITION of 'Commodity Pairs'

The three forex pairs which include currencies from countries that possess large amounts of commodities. The commodity pairs are: USD/CAD, USD/AUD, USD/NZD. These pairs are highly correlated to changes in commodity prices, therefore traders looking to gain exposure to commodity fluctuations often take advantage of these pairs.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Commodity Pairs'

Although there are many countries with large natural resource and commodity reserves, such as Russia, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela, the commodities of many of these nations are usually highly regulated by their domestic governments or thinly traded. The Canadian, Australian and New Zealand dollars are traded at high volumes and are therefore very liquid in the forex market.

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