International Currency Markets

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DEFINITION of 'International Currency Markets'

The market in which participants from around the world are able to buy, sell, exchange and speculate on different currencies. International currency markets are made up of banks, commercial companies, central banks, investment management firms, hedge funds, retail forex brokers and investors.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'International Currency Markets'

Because the international currency markets are large and liquid, it is thought that they are extremely efficient. International currency transactions do no occur on a single exchange, but in a global computer network of large banks and brokers from around the world.

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