Group Of Twenty - G-20

DEFINITION of 'Group Of Twenty - G-20'

A group of finance ministers and central bank governors from 19 of the world's largest economies, and the European Union. The G-20 was formed in 1999 as a forum for member nations to discuss key issues related to the global economy. The mandate of the G-20 is to promote growth and economic development across the globe.

BREAKING DOWN 'Group Of Twenty - G-20'

The Group of Twenty consists of the members of the G-7, 12 other nations (including China, India, Brazil and Saudi Arabia), and rotating council presidency from the European Union. The commitee's inaugural meeting took place in Berlin in December of 1999.

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