Group Of Twenty - G-20

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Group Of Twenty - G-20'

A group of finance ministers and central bank governors from 19 of the world's largest economies, and the European Union. The G-20 was formed in 1999 as a forum for member nations to discuss key issues related to the global economy. The mandate of the G-20 is to promote growth and economic development across the globe.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Group Of Twenty - G-20'

The Group of Twenty consists of the members of the G-7, 12 other nations (including China, India, Brazil and Saudi Arabia), and rotating council presidency from the European Union. The commitee's inaugural meeting took place in Berlin in December of 1999.

RELATED TERMS
  1. United Nations - UN

    An international organization formed in 1945 to increase political ...
  2. Food And Agriculture Organization ...

    A United Nations agency that works on international efforts to ...
  3. Group of 77

    The largest intergovernmental organization of developing nations ...
  4. World Trade Organization - WTO

    An international organization dealing with the global rules of ...
  5. Group Of Seven - G-7

    A forum of the world's seven most industrialized economies. The ...
  6. Group of Five - G-5

    Name given to the five industrialized nations that meet periodically ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    The Dark Side Of The WTO

    The World Trade Organization has its share of detractors. Find out why this international entity has such harsh critics.
  2. Economics

    Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering?

    Proponents of globalization argue that it helps the economies of developing nations and makes goods cheaper, while critics say that globalization reduces domestic jobs and exploits foreign workers. ...
  3. Insurance

    What Is The World Bank?

    You've heard of the World Bank, now find out how it functions and why some groups oppose it.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    An Introduction To The International Monetary Fund (IMF)

    Chances are you've heard of the IMF. But what does it do, and why is it so controversial?
  5. Economics

    What Is An Emerging Market Economy?

    Emerging markets provide new investment opportunities, but there are risks - both to residents and foreign investors.
  6. Trading Strategies

    How can retirees protect their wealth in a bear market?

    Look at some helpful hints about how to protect your retirement nest egg when the stock market is underperforming or the economy is in recession.
  7. Economics

    What are some limitations of the consumer price index (CPI)?

    Explore some of the basic limitations of the widely used economic indicator, the consumer price index, or CPI, and examine the criticism of its accuracy.
  8. Economics

    What is the difference between fiscal policy and monetary policy?

    Utilizing founding principles of macroeconomics through both fiscal and monetary policy can have drastic effects on a country's economic state.
  9. Economics

    Can the consumer price index (CPI) for individual areas be used to compare living cost among areas?

    Understand why the Consumer Price Index, or CPI, cannot appropriately be used for comparing the cost of living across different areas of the country.
  10. Economics

    Will the consumer price index (CPI) be updated or revised in the future?

    Learn about the consumer price index (CPI) and understand how its purpose and calculation make it necessary to continually update and revise it.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  2. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  3. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  4. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  5. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  6. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
Trading Center