Group of 22 (G22)

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DEFINITION of 'Group of 22 (G22)'

An international summit formed by representatives from 22 countries. Each of the 22 countries sends representatives, such as central bankers or finance ministers, to attend the summit to strategize on global finance. The goal of the G22 is to stabilize the global financial systems and avoid global economic crises through international policies and cooperation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Group of 22 (G22)'

The G22 was announced by APEC leaders in 1997, and first met in 1998 in Washington. The group is made up of the members of the G8 along with 14 other nations. The G22 has since been superseded by the Group of 33 and the Group of 20.

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