Group Of 24 - G-24

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DEFINITION of 'Group Of 24 - G-24'

Twenty-four countries established in 1971 to work together to coordinate the positions of developing countries on international monetary and development finance issues and to ensure that their interests were adequately represented in negotiations on international monetary matters. G-24 is a chapter of the Group of 77 (G-77), the largest intergovernmental group of developing states in the United Nations.



BREAKING DOWN 'Group Of 24 - G-24'

Membership is strictly limited to 24 countries, but any member of the G-77 can join discussions. China has been a "special invitee" since 1981. While it is not an organ of the IMF, the IMF provides secretariat services for the Group.



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