Group Of 24 - G-24

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Group Of 24 - G-24'

Twenty-four countries established in 1971 to work together to coordinate the positions of developing countries on international monetary and development finance issues and to ensure that their interests were adequately represented in negotiations on international monetary matters. G-24 is a chapter of the Group of 77 (G-77), the largest intergovernmental group of developing states in the United Nations.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Group Of 24 - G-24'

Membership is strictly limited to 24 countries, but any member of the G-77 can join discussions. China has been a "special invitee" since 1981. While it is not an organ of the IMF, the IMF provides secretariat services for the Group.



RELATED TERMS
  1. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of: 1. ...
  2. World Trade Organization - WTO

    An international organization dealing with the global rules of ...
  3. Global Financial Stability Report ...

    A semiannual report by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) ...
  4. Lesser-Developed Country - LDC

    A country that is considered lacking in terms of its economy, ...
  5. Emerging Market Fund

    A mutual fund or exchange-traded fund that invests the majority ...
  6. Federal Reserve Board - FRB

    The governing body of the Federal Reserve System. The seven members ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    The Basics Of Tariffs And Trade Barriers

    Everything you need to know - from the different types of tariffs to their effects on the local economy.
  2. Forex Education

    How International Tax Rates Impact Your Investments

    International investors need to be aware of the staggering correlation between tax rates and economic performance.
  3. Economics

    What Is The World Trade Organization?

    The WTO sets the global rules of trade. But what exactly does it do and why do so many oppose it?
  4. Taxes

    What is the best method of calculating depreciation for tax reporting purposes?

    Learn the best method for calculating depreciation for tax reporting purposes according to generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Are accounts receivable used when calculating a company's debt collateral?

    Learn how accounts receivables are recorded as assets on a balance sheet; they are used when calculating a company's total debt collateral.
  6. Economics

    How does a high discount rate affect the economy?

    Find out what would happen if the Federal Reserve decided to set a very high discount rate, the rate at which banks can borrow money from the Federal Reserve.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Work In Progress (WIP)

    Work in progress, also know as WIP, is an asset on the company balance sheet. WIP is the accumulated costs of unfinished goods that are currently in the manufacturing process.
  8. Economics

    No Exit: What Could Happen If the Eurozone Breaks Up?

    There is no exit strategy for nations in the eurozone or the EU because most members acknowledge that they are far better off together than apart.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between cost of equity and cost of capital?

    Read about some of the differences between a company's cost of equity and its cost of capital, two measures of its required returns on raised capital.
  10. Economics

    How do economies of scale work with globalization?

    Discover how globalization can lead to unprecedented economies of scale for firms across the world, leading to higher global efficiency and productivity.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Command Economy

    A system where the government, rather than the free market, determines what goods should be produced, how much should be ...
  2. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  3. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  4. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  5. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  6. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
Trading Center