Gap Amount

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Gap Amount'

Insurance will only cover a certain amount of coverage if leased items are stolen or totaled. There is often a difference between the amount the insurance company covers and the amount of the vehicle that is owed under the lease agreement, because of the way lease agreements are structured.


Gap amount is the portion of a leased item's value that is not covered by insurance, in the event of a total loss from an accident or theft. Its calculation is based on the terms of the lease's early termination payoff provision. To protect against losing money because of the gap amount, consumers can purchase gap insurance.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gap Amount'

The lease payments at the beginning of the lease term do not fully cover the vehicle's depreciation, because vehicles depreciate in value more quickly when they are newer and because a consumer's vehicle lease payments are flat amounts paid monthly over a period of several years.


For example, a consumer might lease a $25,000 car for three years. It might depreciate by $5,000 in the first year, but the lessee might only pay a total of $3,600 in lease payments during that time. If the car is totaled at the end of the first year, the consumer will need to make up for the difference between what they paid and the value the car has lost. The gap amount would be $1,400, in this case.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Lease Balance

    The amount of money that a customer owes under the terms of a ...
  2. Lease Extension

    A legal agreement that extends the term of a rental agreement. ...
  3. Open-End Lease

    A rental agreement that obliges the lessee (the person making ...
  4. Lease

    A legal document outlining the terms under which one party agrees ...
  5. Leveraged Lease

    A lease agreement that is partially financed by the lessor through ...
  6. Closed-End Lease

    A rental agreement that puts no obligation on the lessee (the ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How does transfer pricing help business?

    Transfer pricing involves the trade of goods or services between two related companies, and both can come out the winner. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do I calculate my effective tax rate using Excel?

    Your effective tax rate can be calculated using Microsoft Excel through a few standard functions and an accurate breakdown ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How important are contingent liabilities in an audit?

    Contingent liabilities, when present, are very important audit items because they normally represent risks that are easily ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does quantifying fixed overhead volume variance show whether a company is profitable ...

    Fixed overhead volume cannot definitively prove a company is profitable, but it can be used to provide an excellent indication ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does inventory turnover tell an investor about a company?

    The inventory turnover ratio determines the number of times a company's inventory is sold and replaced over a certain period. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is a deferred tax liability?

    A deferred tax liability is an account that is listed on a company's balance sheet and occurs when its taxable income is ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Budgeting

    12 Car Insurance Cost-Cutters

    If car costs are dragging you down, find out how to free yourself from some of the extra weight.
  2. Personal Finance

    Top 10 Ways To Get Top Dollar For Your Car

    Find out what steps you can take to reduce the depreciation of your vehicle.
  3. Home & Auto

    Wheels Of A Future Fortune

    Buy a quality car without driving your expenses through the roof.
  4. Home & Auto

    New Wheels: Lease Or Buy?

    These two major ways to obtain a car have very different advantages and drawbacks. Find out which is best for you.
  5. Options & Futures

    Beginner's Guide To Auto Insurance

    Find the perfect policy that suits both your coverage and budgetary needs.
  6. Options & Futures

    Top Tips For Cheaper, Better Car Insurance

    Accident, theft, vandalism - make sure your coverage will protect you when you need it most.
  7. Insurance

    The True Cost Of Owning A Car

    Driving is often the most convenient way to get around, but it'll cost you.
  8. Investing Basics

    Explaining Write-Downs

    A write-down is a reduction in the book value of an asset because it is overvalued compared to the market value.
  9. Economics

    What are Noncurrent Assets?

    Noncurrent assets are property that a company owns that will last for more than one year.
  10. Professionals

    An Advisor's Guide to Prof. Liability Insurance

    A guide to what financial advisors need to know about professional liability insurance.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  2. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  3. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  4. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  5. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
  6. Rule Of 70

    A way to estimate the number of years it takes for a certain variable to double. The rule of 70 states that in order to estimate ...
Trading Center