Gap Analysis

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Gap Analysis'

1) The process through which a company compares its actual performance to its expected performance to determine whether it is meeting expectations and using its resources effectively. Gap analysis seeks to answer the questions "where are we?" (current state) and "where do we want to be?" (target state).


2) A method of asset-liability management that can be used to assess interest rate risk or liquidity risk excluding credit risk. Gap analysis is a simple IRR measurement method that conveys the difference between rate sensitive assets and rate sensitive liabilities over a given period of time. This type of analysis works well if assets and liabilities are compromised of fixed cash flows. Because of this a significant shortcoming of gap analysis is that it cannot handle options, as options have uncertain cash flows.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gap Analysis'

1) Conducting a gap analysis can help a company re-examine its goals to determine whether it is on the right path to be able to accomplish them. A company will list the factors that define its current state, outline the factors that are required to reach the target state, and then determine how to fill the "gaps" between the two states.


2) Gap analysis was widely used in the 1980's typically in tandem with duration analysis. It was found to be harder to use and less widely implemented than duration analysis but it can still be used to assess exposure to a variety of term structure movements.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Competitive Advantage

    An advantage that a firm has over its competitors, allowing it ...
  2. Product Differentiation

    A marketing process that showcases the differences between products. ...
  3. Comparative Advantage

    The ability of a firm or individual to produce goods and/or services ...
  4. Marketing

    The activities of a company associated with buying and selling ...
  5. Core Competencies

    The main strengths or strategic advantages of a business. Core ...
  6. Duration

    A measure of the sensitivity of the price (the value of principal) ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What's the difference between the coverage ratio and the levered free cash flow to ...

    Coverage ratios focus on a company’s ability to manage its debt, while the levered free cash flow to enterprise value ratio ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. If a long call is owned on the record date of a stock, is the owner of the option ...

    The owner of a long call for a stock is entitled to a dividend only if the option is exercised prior to the ex-dividend date, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do businesses determine if an asset may be impaired?

    In the United States, assets are considered impaired when net carrying value (book value) exceeds expected future cash flows. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can I set up an accrual accounting system for a small business?

    First, determine whether accrual accounting makes the most sense practically and financially. If the small business is also ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why is work in progress (WIP) considered a current asset in accounting?

    Accountants consider work in progress (WIP) to be a current asset because it is a type of inventory asset. Accountants consider ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading

    Competitive Advantage Counts

    What's the best indicator of a company's future success? Its ability to succeed when others fail.
  2. Professionals

    Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats

    Memorable advertising is a brick in the fortress that keeps competitors at bay.
  3. Entrepreneurship

    In Small Business, Success Is Spelled With 5 "C"s

    Incorporating these steps will help your business thrive in a competitive market.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    The Financial Characteristics Of A Successful Company

    There are many factors that contribute to a profitable business. Find out what they are here.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Use Duration And Convexity To Measure Bond Risk

    Find out how this measure can help fixed-income investors manage their portfolios.
  6. Investing

    3 Secrets Of Successful Companies

    Make smart investments by spotting up-and-coming success stories early.
  7. Economics

    Explaining the EBITDA Margin

    EBITDA margin can provide an investor with a cleaner view of a company's core profitability.
  8. Economics

    The U.S. Economy May Be Stronger Than You Think

    While the economic performance in the U.S. broadly disappointed in the first quarter, temporary factors presented one-off events that depressed output.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  10. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  2. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  3. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  4. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
  5. Adverse Selection

    1. The tendency of those in dangerous jobs or high risk lifestyles to get life insurance. 2. A situation where sellers have ...
Trading Center