Gapping

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DEFINITION of 'Gapping'

In general, a trading strategy in which the participant borrows short and lends long. This strategy gives the lender an overall better interest rate as short rates are generally lower than long rates. Also in technical analysis, gapping can refer to the use of a gap strategy which looks at stocks that display price gaps from previous closes.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gapping'

To employ a gap strategy an investor can scan the morning prices for a gap and watch to see what the stock does in the first couple hours of the trading day. In general, if the price goes up, it signals a buy, and if it goes down, a short. There are several variations of the gap strategy.

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